Saturday, August 30, 2008

10 MORE OLD TIME HELPFUL HINTS

Here are more of the helpful hints for the back of an old cookbook I found.

1. To keep nuts from sinking to the bottom of cake or bread batter, shake them in a paper bag with a pinch or two of flour.
2. Do not discard worn pillow slips. Cut a small hole in the seamed end and slip it over a hanger as protection for clothes.
3. Use cotton swabs dipped in lukewarm soap or detergent suds to clean the grooves of carved furniture.
4. Potatoes soaked in salt water for 20 minutes before baking will bake more rapidly.
5. A pie crust will be more easily made and better if all the ingredients are cool.
6. To cut fresh bread easily, cut with a hot knife.
7. Tablecloths and sheets should be folded crosswise occasionally. It will make them last longer.
8. To prevent the iron from sticking, add a little salt to the starch.
9. To remove iodine stains from linens rub the stained area with a slice of lemon.
10. Fruit stains may be removed with a strong solution of borax, or the stain moistened with water, rubbed with borax, and boiling water poured through.


BANANA WALNUT BREAD

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup shortening
2 tbsp milk
1 tbsp vinegar
1 cup chopped walnuts
3 very ripe crushed bananas
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp soda
2 cups flour

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine all ingredients and bake in greased loaf pan for 50 to 60 minutes.


WINTER APRICOT COMPOTE

2 cans (30 oz each) apricot halves
1 cup apricot nectar
1 1/2 tbsp cornstarch
3 tbsp cold water
1 tbsp curry powder
1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1 cup dried pitted prunes
1 can (30 oz)pear halves, drained
1/2 cup toasted shredded coconut, optional

Pour 2 cups syrup from apricots into a large skillet. (Use remaining syrup in drinks and desserts.) Add nectar to syrup; boil rapidly until volume is reduced to 1 1/2 cups. Blend cornstarch and water in a large saucepan; stir in curry powder and sugar. Gradually stir in syrup mixture. Simmer mixture, stirring constantly, for 30 seconds. Add prunes and drained apricot and pear halves; simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes or just until heated through. Spoon into attractive chafing dish and serve with coconut, if desired.

This is another recipe from a 1975 The Workbasket magazine.

EARLY COLONIAL BREAD

1/2 cup yellow corn meal
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tsp salt
2 cups boiling water
1/4 cup cooking oil
2 pkgs active dry yeast
1/2 cup lukewarm water
3/4 cup sifted whole wheat flour
1/2 cup sifted rye flour
4 1/4 to 4 1/2 cup sifted all-purpose flour

Combine the corn meal, brown sugar, salt, boiling water, and oil. Let cool to lukewarm, about 30 minutes. Soften yeast in the 1/2 cup lukewarm water. Stir into the corn meal mixture. Add the whole wheat and rye flours; mix well. Stir in enough all-purpose flour to make a moderately stiff dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead till smooth and elastic, 6 to 8 minutes. Place in greased bowl, turning once to grease surface. Cover and let rise in a warm place till double, 50 to 60 minutes. Punch down, turn out on lightly floured surface and divide in half. Cover and let rest 10 minutes. Shape into two loaves and place in greaded 9-inch loaf pans. Let rise again till almost double, about 30 minutes. Bake in a 375 degree oven for 45 minutes or until done. (Cap loosely with foil after first 25 minutes if bread browns rapidly.) Remove from pans. Cool on rack.

FLUFFY RAISED DOUGHNUTS

1 cup milk
1 pkg dry yeast
1/2 cup lukewarm water
1 tsp sugar
1/4 cup shortening
1/4 cup sugar
1 egg, well beaten
1 tsp salt
3 1/2 cups flour

Scald one cup milk and cool to lukewarm. Dissovle yeast in bowl in lukewarm water and 1 tsp sugar. When foamy, add to cooled milk. Stir in shortening, 1/4 cup sugar, egg, and salt. Beat in flour. On floured board, knead until smooth. Place in a greased bowl, let rise to doubled. Punch down and let rise until doubled again. Roll dough 1/2" thick and cut with a doughnut cutter. Cover and let rise until light and fluffy. Fry in deep hot fat. Glaze with a water and sugar mixture.

Friday, August 29, 2008

SQUASH PIE

2 rounded cups cooked and strained winter squash
1 cup sugar
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tbsp flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ginger
1 pint sweet milk
2 regular pie shells OR 1 large deep dish pie shell

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
Combine squash and sugar; add egg and mix. Mix together flour, salt, cinnamon, and ginger. Mix into the squash mixture. Gradually add milk. Mix well and pour into unbaked pie shell/shells. Bake at 450 degrees for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 325 degrees and bake 50 more minutes.

Note: You can substitute pumpkin for the squash to make a pumpkin pie.


ANADAMA BREAD

4 1/2 to 4 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 pkgs active dry yeast
2 cups cold water
1 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup molasses
1/3 cup lard
1 tbsp salt
2 eggs
2 tbsp butter, melted

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
In a large mixing bowl, mix 1 cup of the flour and the yeast. In a saucepan, mix water and cornmeal; cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Remove from heat; stir in molasses, lard, and salt. Cool till just warm (115-120 degrees). Add cornmeal mixture to the flour mixture and add eggs. Beat at low speed of electric mixer for about 1/2 minute, scraping down sides of bowl. Beat 3 minutes at high speed. By hand, stir in enough remaining flour to make a moderately stiff dough. Turn out on lightly floured board; knead till smooth (8-10 minutes). Place in a greased bowl, turning once to grease surface. Cover and let risetill double (about 1hour). Punch down dough; divide in half. Cover and let rest 10 minutes. Shape into two loaves and place in greased 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2-inch loaf pans. Cover and let rise till almost double (about 45 minutes). Brush with butter. Bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes; cover with foil. Bake 20 minutes longer.


Thursday, August 28, 2008

SWISS VENISON ROUND STEAK

2 venison round steaks, approx 1 1/2 lbs
1/4 cup flour
2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
1/4 cup butter
1 cup water
1 med onion, chopped
1 cup diced celery
1/2 cup sour cream

Wipe steaks clean with a damp cloth. Combine flour, salt and pepper. Pound flour mixture into the steaks using the edge of a sturdy saucer. Brown both sides of the steaks and any remaining flour mixture in the butter. Add 1/4 cup of the water. Cover and simmer slowly, adding remaining water as needed. When the meat is almost tender (after 1 to 2 hours), add onion and celery; cook until thoroughly tender. Stir in the sour cream and cook for 2 minutes longer. Serve at once. From 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours of total cooking time will be required, the time depending on the age of the animal. Serves 5.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

MORE OLD-TIME TIPS

As promised, here are more of the old-time tips found in the back of an old cookbook.

1. When baking a milk pudding, place the dish in a pan of water in the oven. This prevents the pudding from burning or boiling over.

2. A well-beaten white of egg added to mashed potatoes will add to the looks and taste of the dish.

3. When bread is baking, a small dish of water in the oven will help to keep the crust from getting too hard.

4. To draw out the salt from salted fish, add a glass of vinegar to the water in which the fish is soaking.

5. Add 1/4 teaspoon baking soda to cranberries while cooking and they will not require much sugar.

6. To keep milk or cream from souring in hot weather, stir in a small quantity of bicarbonatge of soda.

7. All seasonings should be added gradually to soup, or the flavor may be too strong.

8. A little finely grated cheese added to thin soup improves the taste immensely.

9. If parsley is washed with hot water, instead of cold, it retains its flavor and is easier to chop.

10. To prevent the odor of boiling ham or cabbage permeating the house, add a little vinegar to the water in which they are boiled.

There you have it, folks. Ten more tips for everyday use. I especially like #6. But I'm sure that was very important to folks many years ago. Anyway, it is fun to share these tips with you.



FESTIVE YAM SOUFFLE

3 eggs
2 tbsp light brown sugar (more if using fresh yams)
2 tsp grated orange peel
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp nutmeg
3 cans (16 oz each) yams or 6 yams, cooked, peeled and mashed
2/3 cup light cream or milk
2/3 cup chopped pecans
6 tbsp butter, melted
miniature marshmallows for garnish
pecan halves for garnish
maraschino cherry halves, drained, for garnish

As early as 8 hours before baking, beat eggs, sugar, orange peel and seasonings in a large mixing bowl until light and fluffy. Stir in yams, cream, pecans, and butter. Chill in baking dish. Bake at 325 degrees, in a 1 1/2-qt casserole dish for 50 minutes. Garnish by alternating marshmallows, pecan halves, and cherry halves around top of casserole.

BUTTERMILK BISCUITS

5 cups flour
3/4 cup shortening or lard
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp soda
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp sugar
1 pkg yeast
1/3 cup warm water
2 cups buttermilk

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Sift dry ingredients together into large bowl. Cut shortening into flour mixture. Add buttermilk and yeast that's been dissolved in the warm water. Mix with a spoon until all the flour is moistened. Cover and set in refrigerator till ready to use. Take out as much dough as needed. Roll out on a floured board to 1/2" to 3/4" thick. Cut using a biscuit cutter or small glass. Bake 12 minutes until browned. Keep unused dough in refrigerator for use the next day.


MOLASSES OATMEAL BREAD

2 cups dry oatmeal
4 cups boiling water
1/2 cup molasses
1/2 cup soft shortening
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup raisins
3 tsp salt
2 pkgs dry yeast in 1/2 cup warm water
5 cups flour
6 - 7 cups flour

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Combine oatmeal and boiling water; let stand 1 hour till cool. Add next 7 ingredients, mix well and let rise. Add rest of flour and knead well. Let rise again, form into loaves and let rise until light. Bake at 350 degrees about 45 minutes. Makes 3 large or 4 medium loaves. This bread freezes well. Can also be make into rolls.


Monday, August 25, 2008

10 Old-Time Tips

Following are some tips I found in the back of an old cookbook. I will post a few tonight with more to follow at other times.

1. Measure a cupful of whipped cream after it is whipped.
2. To avoid lumps in batter, add a pinch of salt to the flour before it is wet.
3. To cream butter and sugar, warm a bowl, put the butter in, then sieve the sugar on top. Beat until the mixture is like whipped cream.
4. To improve the flavor of old potatoes, add a little sugar to the water in which they are boiled.
5. To keep lint from clinging to blue jeans and corduroys, add a half cup of vinegar to each wash load.
6. Bury the yeast cake in salt and it will keep for some time.
7. Heat lemons well before using and there will be twice as much juice.
8. To prevent cakes from burning, sprinkle salt in the oven under the baking pans.
9. Never beat egg-whites in an aluminum pan, it is sure to darken them.
10. If egg yolks become stringy after being added to hot puddings, especially tapioca, use a beater; the lumps will adhere to the beater, and leave the pudding smooth.


NEVER FAIL POPCORN BALLS

1 cup white syrup
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp butter
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup unpopped popcorn, popped

Pour popcorn into a large glass mixing bowl or other bowl that won't be ruined by the hot syrup. Bring syrup to a boil, add sugar to syrup and return to boil. Remove from heat and add baking powder and butter; stir until smooth. Add vanilla. Pour over popcorn, let stand a couple of minutes then shape into balls using your hands that have been lightly buttered.

Yield: approximately 18 popcorn balls


SALTED PEANUT CAKE

1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup lard**
1 egg
1 cup sour milk*
1 tsp soda
1 cup ground salted peanuts
1 1/2 cups flour

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Mix all ingredients together in the order listed. Grease and flour a 9 x 13-inch pan. Pour batter into pan and bake for 30 to 35 minutes.

*buttermilk **you can replace lard with shortening or butter

Sunday, August 24, 2008

FRENCH MASON JAR DRESSING

1 can tomato soup
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 cup oil
1/4 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp pepper
1/2 tsp prepared mustard
1 small finely chopped onion
1/2 tsp celery seed

Beat all ingredients together and store in a covered jar in the refrigerator. Makes 3/4 quart.

Note: Blender works great for blending this dressing.

Saturday, August 23, 2008

CAKE DONUTS

1 cup sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup sour milk
1 tsp soda
1/2 cup sweet milk
1 tsp baking powder
2 tbsp melted lard or shortening
1 tsp vanilla
pinch of salt
flour

Mix sugar and eggs together. Add sour milk and soda mixed in milk. Add sweet milk and melted lard. And vanilla and flour with salt and baking powder mixed into the flour. Use enough flour to make a dough stiff enough to roll and cut donuts with a donut cutter. Makes 30.

Note: Sour milk is buttermilk; sweet milk is regular milk


TURKEY ROUND-UP

This is another recipe my mother got years ago from The Workbasket magazine. This little homemaker's magazine featured recipes sent in by readers.

2 cups diced cooked turkey
1 cup frozen peas, cooked
1/2 cup diced celery, cooked
1 can cream of chicken soup
Chinese noodles

Combine all ingredients, except noodles, together in a bowl. Pour into a greased casserole dish, top with noodles and bake at 350 degrees until bubbly.

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS

2 cups flour
4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
2 tsp sugar
1/2 cup shortening
3/4 cup milk

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Sift all the dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Using two knives, cut in shortening until crumbly. Add milk and mix in well. Roll out on a lightly floured surface and cut with a biscuit cutter. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes.

APPLESAUCE CAKE

This is another good old family recipe from Southern Indiana.

1 1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup shortening or oleo
1 egg
1 1/2 cups unsweetened applesauce
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp cloves
2 cups flour
1/4 tsp salt
2 tsp soda
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup raisins (I omit because I hate raisins!)
1/2 cup nuts, optional (I use 1 cup since I don't use raisins.)

In a large mixing bowl, mix all ingredients together except raisins and nuts. Blend with electric mixer until well blended. Pour into a greased 9 x 13-inch baking pan and bake in a 375 degree oven approximately 45 minutes or until done.

SQUASH PIE

2 cups cooked squash
3 eggs lightly beaten
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 cup Milnot
1 stick margarine
9-inch uncooked pie shell

To cook squash: Peel squash, cut in half lengthwise, spoon out seeds. Cut up into a saucepan and add 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cover with a lid. Cook until tender.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

To make pie: Into a large mixing bowl, put squash, margarine, eggs, sugars, spices and milk. Whip together with an electric mixer until well blended. Pour into an unbaked 9-inch pie shell. Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes; reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake 45 minutes longer.


TAFFY

2 cups sugar
1 cup light corn syrup
1/3 cup water
2 tsp vinegar
2 tbsp oleo
2 tsp vanilla

In a 2-quart saucepan, combine sugar, syrup, and water. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until sugar dissolves. Bring to a boil and add vinegar. Cook to soft crack stage or 268 degrees. Remove from heat, add oleo and vanilla. Pour into 2 buttered plates with edges. Cool until able to handle. Butter hands, gather taffy into a ball and pull with fingertips until satiny in color and hard to pull. Pull each piece until it is about 1/2-inch thick. Cut into bite-size pieces and wrap in waxed paper. Makes about 1 1/4 pounds.
Note: This is an old Southern Indiana recipe.


Friday, August 22, 2008

CHICKEN LIVERS FOR ONE

6 TO 8 chicken livers
1 jar (2 1/4 oz) sliced mushrooms
1 cup cooked rice
soy sauce

Saute livers in butter until cooked through. Add mushrooms; season to taste. Serve over rice. Add soy sauce to taste.

CHICKEN CASSEROLE

This chicken casserole recipe is from a 1975 magazine called THE WORKBASKET. The Workbasket was a small magazine that was chocked full of recipes, knitting and crocheting instructions. Many a rural housewife waited anxiously for the local mailman to drop her monthly edition into her mailbox.

CHICKEN CASSEROLE

2 cups diced cooked chicken
2 cups diced celery
1/2 cup slivered almonds
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp chopped onion
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 tsp monosodium glutamate, optional
1/2 cup grated cheese
1 cup crushed potato chips

In greased 2-qt casserole, combine ingredients, topping mixture with cheese and chips. Bake at 450 degrees for 12 minutes or until bubbly.

Thursday, August 21, 2008

CHOCOLATE CHIP BREAD

A favorite of the children.

1 pkg choc. chips, broken
1/2 cup chopped nuts
2/3 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 cups sifted flour
2 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
2/3 cup milk
3 eggs
1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Beat shortening with sugar until creamy. Add eggs and beat into sugar mixture. Mix together flour, baking powder, salt; combine milk and vanilla. Combine flour mixture with milk mixture and add to the sugar mixture. Fold in chocolate chips and nuts. Bake one hour in two greased bread pans.


PERCOLATOR PUNCH

Use a 20 to 30 cup percolator to make this punch that serves 16.

1 qt apple cider
1 pt orange juice
1 tsp whole allspice
3 cinnamon sticks
1 pt cranberry juice
1/2 cup sugar
1 tsp whole cloves

Combine cider and juice in percolator. Place sugar, spices, cinnamon sticks in percolator basket. Let perk until finished.

ORANGE PECAN SWEET POTATOES

Another recipe from the ARGO Cornstarch folks: Orange Pecan Sweet Potatoes

3 lbs. sweet potatoes, peeled
1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans
1 cup brown sugar
2 tbsp Argo Corn Starch
1 cup orange juice
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp vanilla extract

Spray a 3 quart (13 x 9-in) baking dish with cooking spray. Add sweet potatoes and pecans to dish. Combine brown sugar and corn starch in a small saucepan. Gradually add orange juice, whisking to blend. Cook over high heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils. Reduce heat and simmer 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat, add butter and vanilla. Pour over sweet potatoes. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 45 minutes or until edges are browned and bubbly.


Wednesday, August 20, 2008

ARGO CORNSTARCH LIGHT BATTER FOR FRYING MEAT AND VEGETABLES

This old newspaper advertisement says to "Let the natural flavor of your fried vegetables come through with the light touch of Argo and Kingsford's. And try these easy and delicious recipes. You'll agree that for light and crispy fried vegetables or chicken, it really is the batter that matters."

LIGHT BATTER

3/4 cup Argo or Kingford's Corn Starch
1/4 cup flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/2 cup water
1 egg, slightly beaten

In bowl, stir together first 5 ingredients. Add water and egg; stir until smooth. Pour 1 qt (about) corn oil into large skillet to depth of 1/2", filling no more than 1/3 full. Heat over medium heat to 375 degrees. Dip 4 cups cutup vegetables, such as zucchini, carrots, onion, and mushrooms, or 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1" cubes, a few at a time, into batter. (Stir batter occasionally.) Carefully add vegetables or chicken to hot oil, a few pieces at a time. Fry 2 to 3 minutes, turning once, until golden brown and crisp. Drain on paper towels. Serves 4 to 6.
HERB BATTER: Follow basic recipe. Add 1 tsp dried basil leaves and 1 clove garlic, minced.
BEER BATTER: Follow basic recipe. Omit water. Add 1/3 cup cold beer.


Old-Fashioned Classic Apple Pie

What is more traditional than apple pie? Since apple pie has been an American symbol and icon for many, many years, I will start off this blog site with a traditional apple pie and pastry recipe. ENJOY!

Pastry for a double-crust 9-inch pie:

2 cups unsifted all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
2/3 cup lard or solid vegetable shortening
5 to 7 tbsp ice water

In a large bowl, stir flour and salt together until blended. Using a pastry blender or two knives, cut lard or shortening into flour mixture until the mixture becomes mealy.

Mix in ice water a little at a time with a fork, stirring until the mixture leaves sides of bowl and forms a ball. Finish shaping dough into a ball with your hands, cut in half with a knife to form two balls for the top and the bottom of the pan. On a lightly floured board, flatten one ball of dough and roll with a lightly floured rolling pin from center to edge in a circular fashion, making a 12-inch circle. Place pastry into a 9-inch pie pan, fitting gently and trimming off excess dough with sharp knife or scissors. Fill or bake according to recipe. Roll out remaining dough in the same manner to use as a top crust.

Pie Filling:

6 cups thinly sliced, peeled, tart cooking apples
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup sugar
2 tbsp flour
1/4 tsp salt
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tbsp butter or margarine

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

Slice apples into a large bowl and sprinkle with lemon juice. Add sugar, flour, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg to apples; mix together well. Mix apples again with a large spoon then turn into pastry lined pie pan. Dot the surface with the butter or margarine. Place top pastry over pie and seal the edges well. Cut steam vents in center of the top crust or poke several times with a fork. Bake pie in a 425 degree oven for 45 - 55 minutes or until crust turns a golden brown and the filling starts to bubble up through the vents.